TOOTH EXTRACTION

Tooth Extraction is the removal of a tooth from the Dental Alveolus (Socket) in the Maxillary (Upper) or Mandibular (Lower) jawbone.

REASONS FOR AN EXTRACTION

The most common reason for removing a tooth is when it can no longer be restored because of Caries (Cavity/Tooth Decay), Periodontal (Gum) Disease or Trauma.

Here are some other reasons for an extraction:

  • 3rd Molars (Wisdom Teeth) often require extraction because they are impacted (“stuck” in the soft tissue or bone and can’t erupt normally). 3rd Molar impactions can cause Pericoronitis (infections of the soft tissue), Caries on the adjacent 2nd Molars or Cyst or Tumor development that can weaken the jawbone leading to a fracture.
  • Supernumerary (extra) teeth, which are blocking other teeth from erupting normally, often require extraction.
  • If the teeth are severely crowded, they may be extracted for Orthodontics “Braces”.
  • Sometimes the Primary (Baby) teeth don’t “fall out” and need to be extracted to allow the Permanent (Adult) teeth space to erupt normally.
  • People receiving radiation to the head and neck may need to have teeth in the field of radiation extracted.

TYPES OF EXTRACTIONS

There are two types of extractions:

Simple Extractions: These extractions are performed on teeth that are visible in the mouth, usually requiring only local anesthetic.

Surgical Extractions: These extractions involve the removal of teeth that cannot be easily accessed, either because they have broken under the gum line or because they have not erupted fully i.e. 3rd Molars (Wisdom Teeth). Surgical extractions often include a small incision in your gingival (gum) tissue, they may or may not require the removal of some bone and depending on the complexity of the extraction may require referral to an Oral Surgeon.

WHAT TO EXPECT AFTER A TOOTH IS EXTRACTED

After the tooth is removed, you may need Sutures (stitches). Some sutures dissolve over time, and some have to be removed after a few days. Our dental team will advise you if sutures are required.

In most cases, the recovery period lasts only a few days. It is important to follow the instructions given to you by our dental team.

The following instructions will help speed your recovery:

  • Take painkillers as prescribed by your dentist or oral surgeon. Apply an ice/cold pack to the outside of your mouth to help relieve pain and swelling.
  • After 24 hours, rinse your mouth gently with warm salt water several times a day to reduce swelling and relieve pain. Make your own salt water by mixing 1 tsp. (5 g) of salt in a medium-sized glass of warm water.
  • Change gauze pads before they become soaked with blood.
  • Relax after surgery. Physical activity may increase bleeding.
  • Avoid smoking.
  • Eat soft foods, such as gelatin, pudding, or a thin soup. Gradually add solid foods to your diet as healing progresses.
  • Do not lie flat. This may prolong bleeding. Prop up your head with pillows.
  • Avoid rubbing the area with your tongue.
  • Do not use sucking motions, such as when using a straw to drink.
  • Continue to carefully brush your teeth and tongue.

3RD MOLAR (WISDOM TOOTH) DEVELOPMENT

The following Radiographs/X-rays and Video depict the development process of a 3rd Molar:

 

TYPES OF 3RD MOLAR (WISDOM TOOTH) IMPACTIONS & COMPLICATIONS

The following Radiographs/X-rays and Illustrations depict the different types of a 3rd Molar impactions & Complications: